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31st January 2020 Latest News Lung Cancer

Supporting the Next Generation of Research

Researcher in lab

Research like Rhys’s can now pave the way for the development of an anti-cancer drug that can target 14-3-3 proteins.

With 10,000 new cases of lung cancer being diagnosed annually in Australia, and 1000 of those being in South Australia, Rhys Hamon appreciates the need to better understand this disease and find more effective therapies.

“As a small child I loved watching nature documentaries, I was fascinated by the world in which we live. At university I was enlightened to how my fascination of the world could be applied for the benefit of others,” said Rhys.

“I am pursuing a research career because it allows me to challenge myself and apply my knowledge and skills to solve problems that ultimately may improve the lives of others.”

Rhys received a post-graduate scholarship from The Hospital Research Foundation in 2018 and is working at the Centre for Cancer Biology to determine the role of 14-3-3 proteins in lung cancer.

Cellular 14-3-3 proteins are more abundant in 50-60 per cent of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), which increases resistance to treatments and leads to poor prognosis.

NSCLC accounts for up to 90 per cent of lung tumours, and with a survival rate under 15 per cent (for five years post diagnosis) and no improvement in the past 30 years, more needs to be done to improve outcomes for lung cancer patients.

“I have been fascinated with the complexities of lung biology since my introduction to the field. I have moved from a background in chronic lung diseases, including asthma and emphysema, to contribute to the fight to beat lung cancer because new treatment options are required for this aggressive disease.”

Research like Rhys’s can now pave the way for the development of an anti-cancer drug that can target 14-3-3 proteins.

We look forward to keeping you updated on this lifesaving research.

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